Cheese making
History of cheesemaking

It is thought that cheese making originates from more than 2000 years ago. Legend has it that a nomadic herdsman stored his milk in a vessel made from the sheeps' and goats' stomachs on his journey across the desert. On reaching the end of his journey he discovered that the milk had separated into liquid (whey) and solid (curd) - cheese was born and we’re still rejoicing today!

Cheese making was introduced into Britain by the Romans around 54BC and spread throughout the country with differences in processes, sources of milk and storage methods being adopted in different regions.


Cheddar cheese

Cheddar

Probably the most consumed cheese in the world, Cheddar originated from Somerset around the late 12th century and took its name from the gorge or caves in the town of Cheddar that were used to store the cheese. The constant temperature and humidity of the caves provided a perfect environment for maturing the cheese.

Read more


Double Gloucester

Double Gloucester

Originally cheese made in the Severn Vale was made from the milk of Cotswold sheep. As early as 1498 so much cheese was being made in Gloucester that a permanent market was set up in Eastgate Street in the city of Gloucester.

Read more


Red Leicester

Red Leicester

What we call "Red Leicester" cheese today was formerly known as "Leicestershire Cheese" - named like so many of our traditional cheeses after the county from which it originated.

Read more


Information source: British Cheese Board.